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by Gregorio Baggiani

EPOS Insights

The war in Syria is not to be explained only by the political infighting in the country between the Alawites and the Sunni majority, but also by an important energy deal between Russia and Iran. Both the countries intend to steer the energy market in the Middle East and the Gulf region, substantially influencing the price of gas and crude oil on the world markets against other potential competitors in the sector. On the other hand, Turkey's strategy is to become an energy hub with Russia’s help too, also on the aftermath of its difficult relations with the US and the EU after the failed  military coup that has drifted the West and Turkey further apart. In the following exclusive article for EPOS, Gregorio Baggiani analyses the situation pointing out all the geopolitical implications and the economical strategies



Published in Insights
by Idrees Mohammed

EPOS Insights

In the following exclusive article for EPOS, Idrees Mohammed argues that the struggle for Syria is largely related to the pipeline politics and gas geopolitics. The United States, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar have supported the removal of Assad; however, Russia, Iran, and Iraq have supported Assad to remain in power. Both of those who are for and against the removal of Assad have opposite interests that are related to pipelines and gas market. The former group looks for a friendly post-Assad regime that will facilitate their objective; the latter group is just entirely against this scenario. Idrees Mohammed is an expert in International Relations and Kurdish affairs. His MA thesis was on Turkey's policy towards Kurdistan Region. He is a PhD candidate at University of Erfurt, Germany. He was a former lecturer in International Relations at University of Duhok, Kurdistan Region



Published in Insights
by Gregorio Baggiani

EPOS Insights

Gazprom-European Commission relations have been in a state of ferment in recent months because of the investigation into Gazprom that began on 4 September 2012, with charges against it of abusing a dominant market position. This took place after the introduction of the so-called "Third Energy Package" by the European Commission. The package calls for an 'unbundling' between gas distributors and gas producers to allow access to energy transportation to other companies, the so-called 'third parties', and avoid problems regarding monopolies or abuse of dominant market positions and price-fixing collusions. In this exclusive article for EPOS Gregorio Baggiani investigates and focuses on the issue, depicting the scenario and analysing all the positions in the field



Published in Insights
by Gregorio Baggiani

EPOS Insights

For the Russian Federation the European Union has become the most important political subject west of its borders, and issues between the two entities range from energy policy to regional cooperation, security,cultural and technological cooperation, as well as several other complex questions pertaining to international relations as a whole. This article aims to study these issues, dividing them into sectors, and to show the interactions of each within the scope of the complex relations between the EU and Russia

Published in Insights

Epos converses with Dr. Christian Cleutinx

by Alessandro Savaris
EPOS Conversations

Christian Cleutinx, a Belgian, is an international expert in energy security, diplomacy and international dialogues with 30 plus years of experience in geopolitics, international relations and energy with a special emphasis on Russia and the United States. He was until April 1st 2011 Director General of the Euratom Supply Agency at the European Commission. He advises and lectures on energy policy and geopolitics for universities, think tanks and international institutions

Published in Conversations

EU-Russia-U.S. Energy Relations

Friday, 07 August 2009 10:55
by Angelantonio Rosato (EPOS)
EPOS Insights

In an episode that has become all too familiar, the European Union’s announcement last spring that it will finance the modernization of Ukraine’s gas pipeline system sparked tensions with Moscow, again.

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin’s reaction to the news of the EU-Ukraine announcement left little room for ambiguity: “If Russia’s interests are going to be ignored, we will be compelled to begin reviewing the principles of our relations with our partners”It’s a never-ending drama – the gas crisis between Moscow and Kiev. So far the EU has played quite a passive role, but this could change in the future. And it remains to be seen what part the U.S. will play.

Published in Insights
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