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by Kamaran Mohammad (from Erbil, KRG)

EPOS Insights

Kamaran Mohammad, expert in geopolitics, security issues and international relations, is an Assistant Lecturer of Political Science at College of Law and Politics, Salahaadin University, in Erbil. In the following exclusive article for EPOS WorldView, he discusses the future of Mosul, analysing the position of all the armed groups involved in the operation to retake the city after more than two years of Islamic State occupation. Mr. Mohammad tries to answer two questions: how can these forces participate in rebuilding and governing Mosul? Can they be reintegrated into formal army and state institutions? Rebuilding Mosul and all other liberated areas requires a national and comprehensive strategy but, at the moment, there is no vision and common understanding of the priorities, Mr. Mohammad states



Published in Insights
by Valeria Sforzini (EPOS)

EPOS Insights

It is almost clear that Turkey will not ever be seen the same way it was seen before the failed coup that took place last July. It still hard to explain how was it possible for Erdogan to turn an insurrection against his government into his favour. The absolute influence that the government is exerting over the people is touching every aspect of their life, and contrasting it would inevitably be linked to go against religion. The problem is that, even though a part of the population seemed open to embrace progress and to stand for liberty against this government, all of a sudden, everyone seemed prone to give its support to Erdogan and no one was anymore ready to admit a different way of thought



Published in Insights
by Gregorio Baggiani

EPOS Insights

The war in Syria is not to be explained only by the political infighting in the country between the Alawites and the Sunni majority, but also by an important energy deal between Russia and Iran. Both the countries intend to steer the energy market in the Middle East and the Gulf region, substantially influencing the price of gas and crude oil on the world markets against other potential competitors in the sector. On the other hand, Turkey's strategy is to become an energy hub with Russia’s help too, also on the aftermath of its difficult relations with the US and the EU after the failed  military coup that has drifted the West and Turkey further apart. In the following exclusive article for EPOS, Gregorio Baggiani analyses the situation pointing out all the geopolitical implications and the economical strategies



Published in Insights

Epos converses with PhD Federico Donelli

by Nicolamaria Coppola (EPOS)
EPOS Conversations

What happened in Turkey last Friday night? What went wrong? Who was behind the coup? What will be the political consequences? In the aftermah of the failed coup attempt, many questions raise and need to be answered, thus EPOS has interviewed PhD Federico Donelli, expert in Turkish affairs with particular focus to Davutoglu’s doctrine and Turkey’s opening to different regions such as Africa and Latin America. He is the author of many articles on ‘new’ Turkey’s pro-active and multi-tracks approach, focusing on the gradual involvement of civil society’ s organizations in the conduct of the foreign policy. In the following exclusive interview for EPOS he discusses the failed coup attempt in Turkey, exploring what he calls the Sultanate Presidentialism of Mr. Erdogan with which the executive power will be strengthened as a response to the military golpe

Published in Conversations
by Idrees Mohammed

EPOS Insights

In the following exclusive article for EPOS, Idrees Mohammed argues that the struggle for Syria is largely related to the pipeline politics and gas geopolitics. The United States, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar have supported the removal of Assad; however, Russia, Iran, and Iraq have supported Assad to remain in power. Both of those who are for and against the removal of Assad have opposite interests that are related to pipelines and gas market. The former group looks for a friendly post-Assad regime that will facilitate their objective; the latter group is just entirely against this scenario. Idrees Mohammed is an expert in International Relations and Kurdish affairs. His MA thesis was on Turkey's policy towards Kurdistan Region. He is a PhD candidate at University of Erfurt, Germany. He was a former lecturer in International Relations at University of Duhok, Kurdistan Region



Published in Insights

Why Turkey Allowed Peshmarga Passage to Kobane

Thursday, 13 November 2014 12:01
by Idrees Mohammed

EPOS Insights

In the following exclusive article for EPOS, Idrees Mohammed discusses Turkey's attitude towards Kobane, the Syria's Kurdish town attacked by the jihadists of the Islamic State in the last weeks. He analyses the reasons why Turkey, although had refused to act in Kobane directly, has allowed Peshmarga passage to the town. He focuses on all the political relations between Turkish-Kurdish party and Iraqi and Syrian Kurdish parties, and the relations between Turkey and its neighboring countries and between Ankara and the West. Idrees Mohammed is an expert in International Relations and Kurdish affairs. His MA thesis was on Turkey's policy towards Kurdistan Region. He is now focusing on Turkey's policy towards Kurds, including Syria's Kurdish. He teaches International Relations in University of Duhok’s department of Political Science



Published in Insights

Epos converses with Idrees Mohammed

by Nicolamaria Coppola (EPOS)
EPOS Conversations

Idrees Mohammed is an expert in International Relations and Kurdish affairs. His MA thesis was on Turkey's policy towards Kurdistan Region. He is now focusing on Turkey's policy towards Kurds, including Syria's Kurdish. He teaches International Relations in University of Duhok’s department of Political Science. In this exclusive interview for EPOS, Idrees Mohammed talks about what is happening in Mosul, focusing on the Kurdish approach to the crisis, and investigating on the role and the reactions of Iraq's neighbouring countries on the takeover of Mosul by ISIS

Published in Conversations
by Gregorio Baggiani

EPOS Insights

The question of the legal regime of the Caspian Sea, though apparently characterized by a merely legalistic and economic aspect, really hides a political and geopolitical issue of great relevance. Situated at the geopolitical confluence of actors of international importance (China, India, Russia, USA, EU, Iran and Turkey) the Caspian Sea has gradually assumed a strategic role and has attracted the attention of a great number of state and non-state actors present on the international scene


Published in Insights
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