Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 512

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\libraries\joomla\filter\filterinput.php on line 514
EPOS Kurdish Chronicle - photodiary from KRG
   
 
 
Subscribe

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\modules\mod_random_image\helper.php on line 85

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\modules\mod_random_image\helper.php on line 85

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\modules\mod_random_image\helper.php on line 85
politics.png


Warning: Creating default object from empty value in D:\siti\eposweb.org\eposweb.org\components\com_k2\models\item.php on line 445

EPOS Kurdish Chronicle - photodiary from KRG

 
Friday, 24 October 2014 09:32
 
Rate this item
(2 votes)

 

 

by Roxane
EPOS Insights

 

KHANIK - GOVERNORATE OF DUHOK

The IDP camp of Khanki currently has 3,256 tents spread over 776,200 m². It is one of the two refugee camps in the city of Khanik (Khanki) in the Governorate of Duhok. All the IDPs come from the 350 villages of Sinjar, the mountainous area northwest of Mosul, where used to live 650,000 Yazidis. The tents have been set up by UNHCR, and each tent houses one single family. There are families made up of 7 people, but it is not unusual to find families with 28 members.

I am going around with Shivan Darwesh, professor of Kurdish culture and society at the University of Duhok: he speaks French and we can communicate easily. Shivan has come with his little brother Safeen, whom he takes care of.  Safeen is glad to be my  assistant.

As soon as we arrive at the camp, we notice a small group of people in front of prefabricated building of the camp administration that are complaining: they are asking for more tents and more food. They say that there is an enormous lack of  basic necessities, and they want to speak with the camp director. As soon as the camp director appear, they fall silent!

A little girl asks me why we do not build a school for her and all her friends. The suspension of the academic year is one of the biggest concerns in the region: the students, both the residents and the IDPs, have not gone back to school yet because most of the school buildings are housing the refugees.

When I enter the building of the camp administration, the director rises and greets me saying "Oh, Roxane!". His name is Pir Dayan, and I know him. The Pirs are the members of one of the three castes in which the Yazidi community is divided.  The Sheikhs and the Murids are the other two.

Pir Dayan has voluntarily organized the administration of the camp with few friends, and he has welcomed the first refugees from Sinjar. At the moment,  he is the director of Khanki, and is doing his best to provide all the basic necessities for the IDPs.

The refugees enter the office of Pir Dayan two by two, and they point out their requests and needs.  Although they are complaining, the refugees show great respect towards Pir Dayan: they call him "Bira", which means "brother", and  kiss him and shake his hand. Most of the complaints concern the lack of food and tents. The city of Khanik is full and no longer able to house the IDPs from Sinjar; Shengalis are literally crammed into schools, shops and streets.

A new camp of 6,000 tents is under construction, and it will accommodate all the people that have taken refuge in the school buildings.

The refugees say that they do not receive food every day. There is a huge delay in the delivery of  aid, and Pir Dayan tries to explain what is happening. Once every 20 days, KRG gives all its inhabitants basic needs such as rice, sugar, flour, oil, tea, baby milk, soap, laundry; the arrival of thousands of refugees requires a reorganization of the supply and distribution, and it takes time. It is for this reason that there is a lack of food and other necessities.

Members of very large families ask for additional tents in order to fit everybody into a proper space.

Pir Dayan says that he is doing  his best to resolve everyone’s request and he  only asks the refugees to be patient. He arranges a new meeting with some of them, and notes the day and the time down on a pink post-it.

As soon as the refugees have gone away, Pir Dayan offers his time to explain to me how the camp is organized and who is  responsible for what. There are few NGOs operating in the camp: the French Red Cross is responsible for the water supply; UNICEF is involved in the managing of the camp and the Komala association distributes toys to children. That's all! Doctors sometimes come to visit the refugees, and vaccinations are planned in the next weeks to prevent health problems. Each tent site, built on a concrete platform to avoid flooding, has electricity, but is not yet connected to the water mains.

The most pressing needs in addition to food and tents are heaters, blankets, WC and showers. Currently, 8 families share one WC and one shower.

Pir Dayan explains that the camp is not completed yet, and the construction of a hospital and a school have already been programmed. The work should begin in the coming days, to ensure that the refugees will soon be living in favorable conditions.

When I ask Pir Dayan how they manage all the information related to the refugees and how they send them to the regional government and the NGOs, he heaves a sigh. "The list of the refugees hosted in Khanki requires  constant updating – Pir Dayan says - because many families leave the camp without saying that they are going away, we have to update the information over and over again, and therefore throw away all the CDs with the information that we had previously collected". I suggest that he could use the database that I have prepared with the approval of EPOS before leaving France, in which it will be possible to enroll the information according to specific criteria: in this way, all the information related to the refugees will be well organized and ready to be used, edited and modified. Pir Dayan is so surprised and impressed by the database that we have created, and he assures me that he will work on it and will do his best to make it functional.

I have lunch at one of Shivan and Safeen brothers' home in Duhok, and after that, I return to the camp with my young assistant to take some pictures and meet some people.  Although I do not have an interpreter, communicating with the refugees is quite esay and Safeen tries to help me with the Kurdish when I have a great difficulty understand.

As soon as we start walking along the main road of the so-called "Second Shengal", the name that the refugees have given the camp of Khanki, we are invited by two families for a cup of tea: we take off our shoes, enter the tent, and  sit down on the mattress together with all the members of this big family. Everyone is smiling, and  both the children and the adults of the family are glad to meet me and my young assistant Safeen. For a while, they seem to forget the bad situation that they are experiencing: like all the other inhabitants of the camp, they come from Sinjar, and they have fled from the Islamic State.

While Safeen is answering their questions, I play with the kids, giving  them kisses and hugs. After that, we take some pictures with our mobile phones. They make you feel comfortable, and you feel like you have been a very close friend of theirs for such a long time. I will probably see some of them in Lalish during their holy feast.

While I am leaving the camp I realize that we humans are all brothers and sisters: we are all equal, and no-one is different from another unless we want it to be this way.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------

 

KHANIK - GOVERNORATE DU DUHOK

Le Khanki IDP camp dispose actuellement de 3.256 tentes réparties sur 776.200 m². C’est l’un des deux camps de réfugiés de la ville de Khanik (Khanki) située dans le Gouvernorat de Duhok. Ici, ils viennent tous des 350 villages du Sinjar qui abritaient la majeure partie des 650.000 Yézidis vivant dans cette zone montagneuse au Nord Ouest de Mossoul.

Les tentes montées par l’UNHCR abritent chacune une famille, mais il en faut parfois deux, tant les enfants peuvent être nombreux. Si la moyenne des membres d’une même famille est de 7 personnes, il n’est pas exceptionnel d’en rencontrer qui en comptent jusqu’à 28.

Je suis accompagnée de Shivan Darwesh qui enseigne la kurdologie à l’université de Duhok et parle le français, et de son petit frère Safeen qui ne laisse jamais ici à personne d’autre le soin de porter mon sac photo et de me servir d’assistant.

A notre arrivée, il y a un petit attroupement devant l’abri préfabriqué de l’administration, et les réclamations fusent : manque de tentes, de nourriture,  les réfugiés sont mécontents, mais le brouhaha cesse aussitôt à l’arrivée de l’administrateur du camp.

Avant de rentrer à sa suite, une petite fille me demande pourquoi on ne lui construit pas une école: c’est une préoccupation majeure dans la région, la rentrée scolaire n’ayant toujours pas eu lieu pour les habitants, et ne se fera probablement pas cette année pour la plupart des enfants réfugiés.

A peine entrée dans le bureau, je suis accueillie par un "Oh, Roxane!" par l’administrateur responsable du camp, Pir Dayan, qui se lève pour m’accueillir. Les Pirs forment l’une des trois castes qui composent la communauté yézidie, avec les Sheikhs et les Murids. C’est de cette caste que sont issus les prêtres, et ses membres sont souvent influents et respectés. C’est le cas de Pir Dayan qui a organisé bénévolement l’accueil des premiers réfugiés du Sinjar à Khanik, et a fait son possible avec quelques amis pour leur obtenir de l’aide, ce qui explique sa présence aujourd’hui à la direction du camp.

Les réfugiés rentrent deux par deux dans le bureau pour exposer leurs réclamations, et tout se passe dans le calme et dans un respect mutuellement partagé. La plupart baisent la main de Pir Dayan en signe de respect, et c’est un plaisir de les voir sourire, intimidés et émus de pouvoir le faire. Ils ne sont pas face à un simple responsable ou à un notable, c’est évident qu’ils l’aiment leur Pir, d’ailleurs ils l’appellent tous "bira" (frère).

La plupart des réclamations portent sur le manque de nourriture et de tentes. Près de 68.000 personnes sont réfugiées dans la ville de Khanik qui compte ordinairement 23.000 habitants, et les Shengalis (habitants de Sinjar) s’entassent dans les écoles, les boutiques, les rues…

La construction d’un nouveau camp de 6.000 tentes est prévue très prochainement, pour abriter en priorité les familles qui occupent actuellement les écoles et permettre leur réouverture, mais il restera encore 2.000 familles sans toit qu’il faut impérativement loger avant l’hiver qui sera là rapidement maintenant.

Plusieurs réfugiés sont ici pour expliquer qu’ils ne reçoivent la nourriture qu’un jour sur deux. La situation est due à un problème de planification dans l’acheminement de l’aide, et Pir Dayan doit déployer des trésors de patience pour apaiser les inquiétudes de chacun. Le gouvernement du Kurdistan donne à tous ses habitants, une fois tous les 20 jours, les produits de base dont ils ont besoin : riz, sucre, farine, huile, thé, lait pour bébé, savon, lessive… mais l’arrivée massive de centaine de milliers de réfugiés nécessite une réorganisation de l’approvisionnement et de la distribution, et des dizaines de milliers de personnes qui vivent dans les rues et ne sont pas enregistrées ne peuvent en bénéficier.

Ici comme au Centre Lalish de Duhok, les réfugiés ont également droit à cette aide gouvernementale, mais rien n’est prévu pour leur fournir des produits frais comme des fruits et des légumes que beaucoup n’ont pas les moyens d’acheter. La demande de tentes supplémentaires revient régulièrement, surtout pour les très grandes familles qui ont besoin de trois ou quatre fois plus de place que ne peut en contenir une tente standard.

Pir Dayan explique qu’il fait ce qu’il peut avec les moyens dont il dispose en exhortant chacun à la patience, et donne un rendez-vous ultérieur qu’il note sur un post-il rose, aux personnes pour lesquelles il pense pouvoir trouver une solution. Quand il a terminé de recevoir la plupart des réclamations du jour, il prend le temps de m’expliquer le fonctionnement du camp. Il doit continuellement éviter le camping sauvage, ce que beaucoup de réfugiés ont du mal à comprendre, et gérer les problèmes d’approvisionnement. En effet, chaque région donne l’aide prévue à ses propres réfugiés, c'est-à-dire à ceux qu’elle a accueillis et qui sont comptabilisés,  mais beaucoup se déplacent d’une région à l’autre sans prévenir et perdent ainsi leurs droits.

Côté ONG, la Croix rouge française s’occupe de l’approvisionnement en eau, et l’UNICEF intervient ici, mais son aide est longue à arriver. L’association Komala a quant à elle distribué des jouets pour les enfants, mais c’est à peu près tout. Des médecins viennent parfois visiter les réfugiés, et des vaccinations sont prévues dans l’avenir pour prévenir les problèmes sanitaires. Chaque emplacement de tente, construit sur une estrade en béton pour éviter les inondations, bénéficie de l’électricité, mais n’est pas encore raccordé aux canalisations d’eau.

Les besoins les plus pressants en dehors du manque de nourriture et de tentes, concernent aussi le manque de chauffages, de couvertures, et de cabines de WC et de douche, car il n’y en a qu’une pour 8 familles actuellement.

Pir Dayan m’explique que le camp n’est pas encore terminé et que la construction d’un hôpital et celle d’une école sont programmées. Les travaux doivent débuter dans les prochains jours pour assurer aux réfugiés des conditions de vie plus décentes.

Quand je lui demande comment ils transmettent ici les besoins au gouvernement et aux ONG, il soupire. L’enregistrement des réfugiés nécessite de mettre sans cesse les listes à jour, et beaucoup de familles partent sans prévenir, pensant pouvoir récupérer leur tente si elles changent d’avis. Il faut donc continuellement actualiser les informations et les graver sur CD avant de les envoyer.

Je lui propose d’utiliser la base de données que j’ai préparée avant de partir avec l’aval de EPOS, et lui explique qu’il faudra trouver des bénévoles pour saisir les informations, mais qu’ensuite les modifications seront simplifiées et qu’il pourra sortir les listes dont il a besoin, y compris selon des critères spécifiques. Il ne s’attendait pas à avoir la possibilité de disposer d’un tel outil, et m’assure qu’il devrait pouvoir organiser la saisie, mesurant immédiatement l’avantage et le gain de temps d’une consultation à distance par les organismes autorisés. Je lui laisse ma carte de visite et prends congé pour le laisser à ses réclamations qui continueront jusqu’à son domicile s’il n’a pas terminé, m’explique-t-il amusé, les réfugiés n’hésitant pas à sonner à sa porte quand il leur manque quelque chose.

Après le déjeuner chez l’un des frères de Shivan et de Safeen, je retourne au camp avec mon jeune assistant pour prendre des photos et rencontrer ses habitants. Je n’ai pas de traducteur, mais cela n’empêche pas toute communication ici, et Safeen n’hésitera pas à répondre aux questions me concernant.

A peine avons-nous commencé à parcourir les rues de la 2e Shengal, comme les habitants de Khanik ont surnommé la zone des camps, que nous sommes invités à boire un thé par deux familles occupant un emplacement mitoyen. On nous installe un matelas immédiatement, et chacun ôte  ses chaussures dans ce petit périmètre de béton auquel ils ont assigné le rôle de pièce de réception, comme à la maison.

Les enfants sont ravis, les adultes aussi. Ils viennent de Sinjar, chassés par l’avancée de l’Etat islamique, mais semblent oublier pour l’instant les heures pénibles qu’ils viennent de vivre et le dénuement dans lequel ils sont. Pendant que Safeen répond à leurs questions, j’ai le temps de faire une provision de bisous et de calins avec les enfants, mais les adultes tiennent aussi à avoir leur part de souvenirs de cette parenthèse inattendue, et organisent une séance photo avec leurs téléphones portables. Quand je prends congé, c’est des amis que je laisse.

Je ne peux pas m’arrêter partout où l’on m’appelle pendant le reste de ma visite du camp, mais je réponds aux saluts avant de renvoyer leurs baisers de loin aux mères et aux enfants. Je sais que j’en reverrai certains, probablement à Lalesh leur village saint, peut-être dans quelques jours ou dans quelques années, mais tous me laisseront le souvenir qu’il y a toujours quelque chose à partager, et que les seuls étrangers qui existent sont ceux que nous créons.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Copyright 2013 – 2014 photos by Roxane/EPOS                                                                                                                                                              All rights reserved

Last modified on Friday, 24 October 2014 20:41
Login to post comments
EPOS PARTNERS
Epos Audio Playlist
Open in new window
Epos Suggested Links